thenearsightedmonkey

thenearsightedmonkey:

Hello my dear Students,

Soon we will begin our time together.

Before first class, I’d like you to do a couple of things.

One is to buy a roll of scotch tape and bring it to class with you along with a black flair pen. This is all you’ll need for our first day.

You’ll also need  to pick out a character name for yourself.

It has to be the name of a fictional character that already exists in the world (Scrooge, Hello Kitty, Medusa) or a famous person (Beyonce, Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Abraham Lincoln) Feel free to chose a character of any gender, physical appearance, nationality, or time-period and don’t fret too much about it. Pick someone you feel some sort of attachment to. For example, I’ve always felt a strong attachment to wookies so last semester I was Professor Chewbacca.  This semester I’ll be Professor Bootsy because of my strong attachment to ‘the one’


When you’ve chosen your name, please email me and let me know what it is. I’ll need to hear from you before Saturday Aug 30

I am sincerely looking forward to seeing you all on ‘the one’ in 3-D on September 3,

Professor Bootsy

PS Here are some names students have used in the past. All of these are now retired so they can’t be reused. Please know your character name will also be retired after this semester and will join the following list of immortals.

Bender
Squilliam Fancyson
Bluto
The Princess Anastasia
Dr. Girlfriend
Captain Underpants
G.K.
Inspector Gadget
Dr. Jones
Knuckles
Hermione Granger
Little Nemo
Dick Grayson
Maya the Bee
Spethjasu
Mordechai
Sherlock Holmes
Sluggo
Chewbacca
Obelix
Spinelli
Optimus Prime
Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden
Meelo
The Shmoo
Raven
Squid
Stella Luna
Shark Bait
Avatar Roku
Kal El
Count Chocula
Gorrila Grodd
Pippi Pied Piper
Mighty Mouse
Falada
Ben Bag-Bag
Kitty Forman
Hal 9000
Baubo
Hunca Munca
Twilight Sparkle
Beatrix Kiddo
Free Willy

microculture

microculture:

A class of bacteria commonly found in the guts of people—and rodents—appears to keep mice safe from food allergies, a study suggests. The same bacteria are among those reduced by antibiotic use in early childhood. The research fits neatly into an emerging paradigm that helps explain a recent alarming increase in food allergies and other conditions, such as obesity and autoimmune disease, and hints at strategies to reverse the trend.

thenearsightedmonkey

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

Once you pick your character name, how might you draw yourself as that character?

Here are some of the practice pages I made in my composition notebook while I tried to work out how I’d do it.

Professor Spooky Bootsy or Professor Monkey Bootsy?

It will change, depending on the day but  I will always need my star-glasses on.

Sincerely,

Professor Sincere Bootsy

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

New York City test facility aims to reduce bird-window collisions
via: Birdwatching.com
Up to a billion birds — including pretty Golden-winged Warbler (above) and dozens of other species — die in the United States every year after colliding with buildings. According to New York City Audubon, as many as 90,000 are killed in New York City alone. No doubt, building collisions are a reason why more than 200 species are declining.
So hopes are high that a test facility nearing completion on the grounds of the Bronx Zoo will help deliver an increasingly sought-after component of home and business construction — glass windows and doors that are more bird- and user-friendly.
A joint venture of American Bird Conservancy, New York City Audubon, New Jersey Audubon, and Ennead Architects LLP, the facility will evaluate products through highly refined testing protocols and provide scientifically sound feedback to manufacturers.
The facility will be the second in the United States. Experience gained at the first, a flight tunnel at the Powdermill Avian Research Center in Pennsylvania described in “Eye on Conservation” in February 2013, led to improvements in the New York tunnel. The new facility, for example, will use a standard daylight simulator to control for such variables as changing weather and light intensity…
(read more)
Photograph by Laura Erickson

rhamphotheca:

New York City test facility aims to reduce bird-window collisions

via: Birdwatching.com

Up to a billion birds — including pretty Golden-winged Warbler (above) and dozens of other species — die in the United States every year after colliding with buildings. According to New York City Audubon, as many as 90,000 are killed in New York City alone. No doubt, building collisions are a reason why more than 200 species are declining.

So hopes are high that a test facility nearing completion on the grounds of the Bronx Zoo will help deliver an increasingly sought-after component of home and business construction — glass windows and doors that are more bird- and user-friendly.

A joint venture of American Bird Conservancy, New York City Audubon, New Jersey Audubon, and Ennead Architects LLP, the facility will evaluate products through highly refined testing protocols and provide scientifically sound feedback to manufacturers.

The facility will be the second in the United States. Experience gained at the first, a flight tunnel at the Powdermill Avian Research Center in Pennsylvania described in “Eye on Conservation” in February 2013, led to improvements in the New York tunnel. The new facility, for example, will use a standard daylight simulator to control for such variables as changing weather and light intensity…

(read more)

Photograph by Laura Erickson